Thigh positioned wearable resistance improves 40m sprint performance: A longitudinal single case design study

A five-week sprint training program with wearable resistance attached to the thighs provides a sprint specific training means for rotational overload and subsequent speed adaption with increased horizontal force production (7.1%) resulting in faster times (2.4-3.4%) over all distance markers during 40 m sprint-running. Lower limb wearable resistance (WR) can be used to provide rotational overload to the limbs, changing the limb’s inertial properties which may potentially modify sprint-running mechanics. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine how thigh positioned WR of 2% body mass affected 40 m sprint-running performance following a 5-week training protocol. One male former sprinter (32 years, 72.4 kg and 180.2 cm, 10.90 s 100 m time) undertook a five-week periodised sprint-training protocol with WR. Inertial measurement units, radar and a high-speed camera were used to measure the variables of interest. Pre and post measures during sprint performance were statistically analysed via the ±2 x standard deviation band method to identify substantial changes. Substantially faster times were found at all distances of 10 m (-3.4%), 20 m (-2.5%), 30 m (-2.4%), and 40 m (-2.4%). Theoretical maximum velocity (1.2%), theoretical measures of horizontal force (7.1%) and maximum power (8.4%) were all substantially increased. Contact times were substantially decreased (-5.5%), while flight times (4.7%) and vertical stiffness (12.9%) were substantially increased. No substantial changes were found in step frequency, thigh angular displacement and thigh angular velocity. WR provides a promising sprint specific training means for rotational overload and subsequent speed adaption with increased horizontal force production resulting in faster times during accelerated sprint-running. Future research is needed with a larger cohort to verify the findings of this case study.
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Subjects: strength training auxiliary device acceleration training means movement velocity speed velocity speed strength maximal strength
Notations: strength and speed sports training science
Published in: Journal of Australian Strength and Conditioning
Published: 2019
Volume: 27
Issue: 4
Pages: 39-45
Document types: article
Language: English
Level: advanced